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 by St. Loser Fan
2 weeks ago
 Total posts:   7154  
 Joined:  May 31 2016
United States of America   LA Coliseum
Hall of Fame

RedAlice wrote:Wonder what the Bears’ owner’s reasoning is. It doesn’t say.


Old school owner with no external revenue source suggests possible old school thinking? That’s my only guess.

 by max
2 weeks ago
 Total posts:   4410  
 Joined:  Jun 01 2015
United States of America   Fairfield County, CT
Superstar

Hacksaw wrote:Yeah. The odd number skews balance.
Also do we know if all the 17th games play the same weekend or are they blended randomly into the season?


I highly doubt all the 17th games are played the same weekend. Much too limiting.

I get that the Rams are victims of the first year NFC road team setup. But I expect the full screw the Rams treatment by scheduling the game in the dead of winter. We’ve been getting screwed by the schedule makers since 1967.

 by Elvis
1 week ago
 Total posts:   29214  
 Joined:  Mar 28 2015
United States of America   Los Angeles
Administrator

I'm not sure exactly what this means but i do know that post-covid and with the new CBA, the league is serious about becoming more international...


 by Hacksaw
1 week ago
 Total posts:   19137  
 Joined:  Apr 15 2015
United States of America   AT THE BEACH
Moderator

SD Mr Bently, think SD

 by majik
1 week ago
 Total posts:   757  
 Joined:  Aug 31 2015
United States of America   New Jersey
Veteran

Don’t understand why they want to make the on side kick easier for the kicking team to recover by limiting teams to 9 within 25 yards of the LOS. You are forced into an on side kick for a reason, you sucked most of the game.

Thing said that on 87% chances of teams put 10 men within that box and 13% they put 11. If I saw a team putting 11 within 25 yards, I would get my track star and kick it downfield

 by Elvis
1 week ago
 Total posts:   29214  
 Joined:  Mar 28 2015
United States of America   Los Angeles
Administrator

From MMQB:

https://www.si.com/nfl/2021/04/05/mmqb- ... ompetition

THE NFL'S NEW PLAN ABROAD

Amid all the hubbub over the move to a 17-game season, some significant developments on where the NFL is going internationally took place at last week’s (virtual) owners meeting. To cover that, I jumped on Zoom Saturday morning with Chris Halpin, the league’s chief strategy and growth officer, and Brett Gosper, the ex-CEO of World Rugby, whom the NFL hired a couple months ago to be the NFL’s head of Europe and U.K.

It was a fascinating discussion about where the sport’s going, and we’ll distill it down here for you, because there’s a lot to get to.

• It sounds like the NFL has inched back a little off its old aggressive approach to putting a team in London full-time, but not for a lack of trying. As Halpin sees it, there are five elements needed to make it happen: a fan base that will sustain it and sell out games, a stadium, local government support, working football logistics and, most importantly, an owner who wants to move.

Halpin sees the NFL as having the first three things in London. He adds: “I guess it’s the Serenity Prayer—the things I can control and the things I can’t, and the wisdom to know the difference. At the end of that, there’s a lot we can’t control.” On top of having to have, you know, a team to do it with, the logistics, of course, present a challenge—and are workable in the regular season, perhaps, but difficult in the playoffs.

“The big issue is the football logistics and there’s been extensive work done on it,” Halpin said. “That’s where we work with the competition committee. We’re going to continue to evolve that. That’s going to keep working forward. … London checks the boxes in pretty much all the areas. But the football logistics are the biggest one.”

• Germany’s happening, the question is going to be when. The NFL’s got a solid television partner there (ProSieben), and Germany’s got Europe’s largest economy and at least four suitable stadiums (Berlin’s Olympic Stadium; Munich’s Allianz Arena and Olympic Stadium; and Frankfurt’s Deutsche Bank Park, formerly Commerzbank-Arena) in massive markets that would need just standard work to be NFL ready.

What’s left to do for the NFL is to strike deals there.

“What we’re looking to do is look at the viability and really the best choice of market and partner to manage games in Germany,” Gosper said. “That could be as early as 2022. No decisions yet, but we’ll try to reach a conclusion of that project either late this year or early next year to be able to actually announce where we’re going, if we’re going to Germany at that point in time. So I think once we engage in that process it’s a pretty strong indication that’s what we want to be for one of the games.

“And there’s already some interested partners showing themselves even before we’ve begun the process. So it’s very exciting.”

Germany, per Halpin and Gosper, posted an average-minute-audience of about 600,000 for NFL games last year on ProSebien, which is better than NHL numbers domestically in the U.S., and got an AMA of about 2 million for the Super Bowl (which started after midnight local time). That number doubled the U.K. number. And NFL research showed that 17% of the crowd for the Raiders-Seahawks game at Wembley in 2018 came from Germany, which is pretty staggering.

“And 6,000 inbound from Germany each time we play in the U.K.,” said Gosper. “It’s quite extraordinary. There’s nothing quite like that in sport in the U.K. You get that in rugby—a lot of French and Continentals coming in. But it’s quite unique, that many Germans coming into the U.K.”

• And the plan is to have four international games as the baseline, which is why the requirement was added for each team to have to “host” at least one game over the next eight years (4 x 8 = 32!). Two are contracted out to be played at Tottenham in London, and one each will be earmarked for Germany and Mexico. Owners also empowered the NFL to go forward with games elsewhere in Europe and the Americas.

So beyond England, Mexico and Germany, where will that be? The next two in line for the NFL are Canada and Brazil. How soon? As I’ve heard it, part of the issue for both is that there aren’t stadiums in place that make sense for the NFL right now—with Canada clearly having the fan base to support games there and Brazil moving in that direction.

• Asia and Australia, at this point, are further off in the distance, and logistics, again, rear their head on this one.

“You’ve got the time zones working for you [in Europe], so the teams can leave Sunday night and be back in their city Sunday,” Halpin said. “I mean, even the West Coast teams can get out of London, leave London at 8:00 and get in very late and sleep on the plane, but get in late Sunday night to L.A. and San Fran. It’s such a different ball of wax with the Pacific time zones and 16-hour trips.

“So we’re continuing to build. We have really good activation in Australia. Our sports betting partnership, for example, works great. We’ve got great media partners also across Asia. So yeah, I’d say I’d say for Asia Pacific, it’s going to be media, digital engagement.”

• And then here’s one that I missed last week: The NFL’s going to allow teams to start to sell themselves to other countries, separate from the league’s efforts. As the rules stand, teams can’t sell outside of their home marketing area (a 75-mile radius surrounding their city) in the U.S. or elsewhere. Well, starting now and going through September, the league’s going to take applications for teams to claim countries as international “home markets.”

Teams will have to have a detailed plan for what they’ll do (marketing, youth outreach, partnering with soccer teams, etc.), and why they should be awarded the market. The goal, Halpin says, is to, over time, assign about six teams to the league’s major international markets (they’ll be bidding on entire countries, not parts of it), and have those teams’ efforts complement one another.

“So Team A will come forward and say, ‘I will have this level of player trips, I’ll do a youth football camp, I’ll co-market with the local soccer team or whatever, and I may build a facility there,’ ” Halpin said. “‘I can then sell sponsorships so I can extend my airline or hotel partnerships to Germany, so they can generate revenue to cover those investments and in a host of other things.’ All we care about on this is fan development. This isn’t dollars and cents [for the league office] in the grand scheme of things.”

The premise is that no one gets connected to a sport on a deep level out love for a league itself—it’s about teams and players. And this will allow the teams to sell to those countries, with the idea that it’ll benefit everyone. “Then you get even more people who are connected to the NFL by a specific team or player,” Halpin said. “That helps the 32 in growth, media consumption, etc.”

Now, there is one thing that should be addressed here before we move on—and that’s what looks like the NFL pulling back on the U.K. a little bit. And there might be truth to it in time. The NFL wants to keep playing more games there but, based on the current structure, it’ll need teams volunteering to go to even match the number it’s had in the past (four). And for the British fan, that might be a tough pill to swallow.

But really, this was part of the plan all along. The NFL’s old international chief, Mark Waller, focused on London in large part to try and build a working model that could be replicated elsewhere, and it has been in Mexico and now will be in Germany. So more than taking away from London, this is more an effort to spread the wealth.

“It’s completely the model that Mark Waller championed as he shut down the World League and pivoted to playing live games,” Halpin said. “It really works and drives fandom, showing them the best product up close and creating that impact, that commitment.”

And if you look at Germany’s history with the sport (including Bjoern Werner, Sebastian Vollmer, Markus Kuhn and Jakob Johnson), it’s not too difficult to figure out why that’s the next frontier.

 by St. Loser Fan
4 days ago
 Total posts:   7154  
 Joined:  May 31 2016
United States of America   LA Coliseum
Hall of Fame

“At some point we need to get back to charging $80 to park and $12 for a single bottle of beer”


 by Hacksaw
4 days ago
 Total posts:   19137  
 Joined:  Apr 15 2015
United States of America   AT THE BEACH
Moderator

Not everyone would be onboard but allowing only vaccinated fans and stadium employees to attend GameDay would allow full capacity safely.
Of course getting 2,250,000 football fans to agree on that would be tough sledding.

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129 posts Apr 15 2021