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 by Hacksaw_64
1 week ago
 Total posts:   2698  
 Joined:  Sep 08 2015
Ireland   Sierra Madre, CA
Moderator

Don't Fret

Watch closely
|This was a masterpiece.




P. Mahomes gets pwned

 by AvengerRam
1 week ago
 Total posts:   5017  
 Joined:  Oct 03 2017
Israel   Longwood, FL
Moderator

If I had to list my 3 all-time favorite regular season Rams wins that I watched in person or on TV, I'd have to go with the 1981 comeback win over Atlanta (LeRoy Irvin's 2 punt return TDs), the 1999 win in week 4 vs. the 49ers, and the KC game.

And, yes... Goff's performance in that game was as good as it gets.

 by snackdaddy
1 week ago
 Total posts:   6958  
 Joined:  May 30 2015
United States of America   Merced California
Hall of Fame

That was one to remember. No Kupp. Gurley a non factor. A touchdown drive without Cooks. Although there was a play early on where Gurley was tackled out of bounds and the defender was on the back of his knees. Looked like Gurley came down awkward. I have to wonder if that was where the knee issues began.

 by Elvis
1 week ago
 Total posts:   26473  
 Joined:  Mar 28 2015
United States of America   Los Angeles
Administrator

https://theathletic.com/1963759/2020/07 ... =twittered

Inside Rams QB Jared Goff’s training with 3DQB, and what’s different in 2020

Image

By Jourdan Rodrigue

“This is not a place you just come to work out.”

That’s a point expressed very clearly at 3DQB, a Huntington Beach, Calif.-based quarterback training facility at which the Rams’ Jared Goff has been training since 2017.

Founded by former USC baseball pitcher and coach Adam Dedeaux and renowned pitching/throwing mechanics and motion expert Tom House, 3DQB has, since its inception, attracted quarterbacks from all over the country to its campus each offseason. The idea is to blend four core concepts — functional strength and conditioning, state-of-the-art motion and mechanics analysis, mental and emotional management skills, and nutrition — into specific training plans that focus on elevating individual performance and sustaining long-term workloads and careers in America’s most violent sport.

The company attends to a variety of specific needs and age ranges of its NFL quarterback clients, who have included Goff and Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz (both QBs in their mid-20s), Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan (who is in his late 30s) and Saints quarterback Drew Brees and Bucs quarterback Tom Brady (both in their early 40s).

“I, we at 3DQB, take the training really seriously in the sense that there are specific programs we are putting together with these guys,” said Dedeaux, the grandson of legendary USC baseball coach Rod Dedeaux. “This is not a place you just come to work out. It’s not a place you just come to throw. You’re working on specific things. … Every offseason with these guys starts with, ‘What is it that you’re here to get better at?'”

Each offseason, Goff works with Dedeaux (now the company’s CEO), House, motion mechanics expert John Beck (a former BYU and NFL quarterback) and ex-Arizona State quarterback Taylor Kelly (now the quarterbacks coach at Mater Dei High) three days a week for six weeks ahead of what would normally be his April OTAs report date with the Rams. After OTAs, Goff comes back to 3DQB on the same schedule, this time for the three-to-four weeks before training camp.

But the process isn’t easy. Dedeaux and his team analyze Goff each year, and provide honest — at times, brutally honest — feedback alongside critiques gathered from Rams coaches and players.

Goff just wrapped up his most recent session with Dedeaux and his staff. The 25-year-old quarterback is entering the fifth year of his career at a pivotal time for the franchise. Rams head coach Sean McVay and offensive coordinator Kevin O’Connell hope Goff can take, in their words, “more ownership” of the offense, operate with more autonomy when things break down around him and become more consistent week over week and throw over throw.

In an extensive Q&A with Dedeaux, The Athletic was able to learn about why this type of offseason programming has been so important for Goff and what specific measures he is taking to elevate his game this season.

When you’re in the position that Jared is in right now — entering his fifth year, building comfortability with being a franchise quarterback — what are some things you see with guys making that transition from leaving your first few years of work behind and stepping into this new space?

Truth be told, I’ve had a lot of conversations with Jared about things like that. In my mind, yeah, it’s great that he got his first big contract. We were working toward that, among other things. All of these guys, in some way, shape or form, are and should be motivated by money in a way that we’re talking generational wealth that helps their families for years to come. But one of the things that we talked about numerous times is that understanding that it’s awesome that we got there, but now the intensity of our work and the expectations only go up. If there was one iota of him that would have backed off, or gotten comfortable, or anything, he would’ve been held accountable for that. That’s partially my job, to make sure that he is more committed to the work now than maybe he was three or four years ago when we first started.

This is not an area where I had to push him. We had a couple of candid conversations of, “Let’s just be sure we’re on the same page about what motivates us going forward.” The thing I love about Jared is that every year he has been one of the first ones to call me after the season, whether it has been a playoff loss, when they haven’t been to the playoffs or when they’ve been to the Super Bowl. He’s one of the first ones to start getting stuff on the calendar, to start putting a schedule of the offseason together. I’ve never had to push. If anything, I’ve had to say, “We may not have to do this much” — in terms of time commitment — “but I love the fact that you’re making it a priority.” To me, that sets him up for success in the future. He’s willing to put in the time. My job is to make sure he’s thinking deliberately about the things that he is doing, keeping him on track.

Dedeaux said that even as they design programming for Goff on the field, in the weight room and in the kitchen, they also work with him on the mental-emotional side of the game, including how he’s developing relationships with his coaches and with other players. Dedeaux said the staff gathers feedback on Goff from people throughout the team — intel — that at times is not easy for Goff to hear but is an important part of his development as a franchise quarterback — a process that he welcomes.

That is fascinating. I’d think you have to be a specific personality type to be able to welcome and absorb that kind of critique, because you would like it to make it better in certain ways … putting the ego aside.

There is no doubt. I would say that’s another part of our role here is, if we encounter somebody who is not OK accepting criticism, that’s immediately something we have to work on with them. Because this is not a league where, especially at the quarterback position, where you can be thin-skinned or not open. We say, “Honest, open and willing to change.” If you don’t have that, you’re in the wrong place because the way I look at things is, in a sense, hypercritical because I’m very detail-oriented with how they do things and what their process is. If you ask anybody I work with, (they’ll say) I’m not impressed easily. They aren’t there to impress me. The only thing they’re there to do is to get better. … I hope, in a sense, that it drives them because there is always another level.

Where were some areas that Jared wanted to improve this offseason, or areas in which you wanted to see him improve?

One thing that I basically have said across the board — and one thing that was an emphasis for him — was that with everything in the pandemic, and the fact that they aren’t going to get a lot of practice time, we kind of gathered and expect that offensive line play is going to take some time to get caught up, to get their legs underneath them, to get their communication, especially if they’re working on a new system.

The ability to move inside the pocket and throw off multiple platforms was really important. And one thing Jared had to do a lot of last year was throw off his back foot. Some of that was related to his footwork, which we wanted to clean up. Some of it was related to that understanding that he didn’t have the same space and time (to throw) that maybe he had been accustomed to, and that this year was going to be no different. We worked on the mechanics of how to be able to throw off of the back foot but not lose any of the velocity or take any more off of the arm. And then also, when you’re forced to move and you find yourself on your front foot, how do you throw off your front foot?

There are specific mechanics to doing that to where, once again, you don’t lose mechanical efficiency. It may look completely different to the untrained eye, but we are looking for specific variables of how he’s generating velocity, how he’s generating accuracy, no matter what platform he throws from — back foot, front foot, on the run. And that was a big emphasis for him this offseason.

For me (it’s) knowing, “This is going to be your reality, get used to it,” (not wanting him) to go into survival mode. While everybody else is just going to try to survive, we’re going to thrive because we worked on it. We talked about it specifically, we felt things, we didn’t like things, we moved on, we tried something else, we tweaked his footwork and tried to make things simpler for him. Just the details. Think critically about how we can make it easier.

As you coach, what are some of the benchmarks where you’re able to feel like a guy is really “getting it”?

Jared is an extremely talented thrower. And it’s awesome when he throws an unbelievable pass. But it’s not what you do. It’s how you do it around here. Now, in games, it’s going to be about what you do. But here, it’s about getting better. How you do it matters. How you do it is the reason that Brees and Brady are still playing. … That’s what adds years to a career. When we are creating or setting new goals (and tweaking things) here or there, maybe it’s uncomfortable in the beginning and your results aren’t going to be great, but if you’re patient with the process, you’re going to see improvement. I think that subtle improvement is one of the benchmarks.

Obviously, we have quantifiables for velocity, distance, accuracy. We’re charting a lot of this and we meet after to (break them down). … Taylor Kelly, when I’m out there with Jared, he’s watching every rep with me. When we are taking in what we’re seeing, we’re bouncing ideas. “Was it clean on your end? Is it clean on my end?” There’s always that, on every throw. We have to sign off on every throw before we move on. … When we sign off on 90 percent of a workout, we know we’re on the right path.

One big breakdown area is the idea of a player’s “talent carrying them.” Dedeaux said that a big part of training is understanding where the talent of an arm hides certain imperfections or small details that can ultimately hurt a quarterback in the long term, that maybe they could get away with early in their career.

How can you tell, as a coach, when a guy’s “talent is carrying them” through certain reps or certain throws?

We have a model of what we call “biomechanical imperatives” and “biomechanical inevitabilities.” When we say that his talent is carrying him, it’s that it’s not necessarily the best body position that he’s throwing from, or the velocity he’s generating isn’t contributed the correct way — ground-force, torque and all of that — but they just have arm talent. They’re able to make up for bad body position, or slow feet, or bad posture, with their arm. The result might be great, but we know through experience of watching and developing these guys that the arm takes a beating. They may not feel it at all in May, but over the course of a long offseason … you get into December and you’re inappropriately creating velocity and/or accuracy, your arm and connective tissue and certain joints take a beating. It gets a little harder to make that throw at the end of a season. You don’t get as lucky. You don’t feel quite as great.

But when you do things right consistently over the course of an entire offseason and in-season, you’ll see our guys’ arms thriving into the playoffs or Week 16, 17, 18, because they’ve done so much of “doing it right” and it’s not so much relying on talent. How can we tell? Part of that comes from understanding those biomechanical imperatives: This is what has to happen for you to be efficient. Your feet don’t have to be perfectly aligned, but your posture, your rotation and your kinematic sequencing has to be on-point. And here’s how you do that. Those types of things have to be there behind the throws.

(Photo courtesy of Adam Dedeaux)

 by Hacksaw
1 week ago
 Total posts:   17410  
 Joined:  Apr 15 2015
United States of America   AT THE BEACH
Moderator

I believe that game was the beginning of the end for Gurley. He got tackled late out of bounds from behind and you could see he hurt the knee. Before that he was his old self and after not as consistently. He got dinged later that year in PA iirc.

Goff threw dart after dart with amazing touch. One of the best pure passers in the game.

 by Elvis
1 week ago
 Total posts:   26473  
 Joined:  Mar 28 2015
United States of America   Los Angeles
Administrator

Hacksaw wrote:I believe that game was the beginning of the end for Gurley. He got tackled late out of bounds from behind and you could see he hurt the knee. Before that he was his old self and after not as consistently. He got dinged later that year in PA iirc.

Goff threw dart after dart with amazing touch. One of the best pure passers in the game.


That's my take too. Yeah Gurley had some big usage after that tackle on the sideline so maybe it's not the right take, but overall (with some exceptions) Gurley and his usage were not the same after that play...

 by /zn/
1 week ago
 Total posts:   5635  
 Joined:  Jun 28 2015
United States of America   Maine
Hall of Fame

Hacksaw wrote:I believe that game was the beginning of the end for Gurley. He got tackled late out of bounds from behind and you could see he hurt the knee. Before that he was his old self and after not as consistently. He got dinged later that year in PA iirc.

Goff threw dart after dart with amazing touch. One of the best pure passers in the game.


Remember, according to Gurley he had knee issues in game 1 against Oakland. An arthritic knee can flare up with pain and swelling, though that can be managed to an extent. Then in game 2 he was still less than himself against the bad run defense Arizona had that year. Then he was fine for several games and then as we know he had another flare-up.

Maybe a bad hit made it worse later in the season. That can happen too. Or hits--probably more than one game. (He was good in the Detroit game, which came after the bye after the Chiefs game.)

But there's no injury he could have gotten in just one game in 2018 that would have on its own caused the decline in his play we saw in 2019. There was no surgery after 2018, so what can happen to a knee where from that point on he's not the same player...yet there was nothing to repair with surgery? The best guess is that an arthritic knee got worse. The same knee problem that flared up in game 1 of 2018.

 by /zn/
1 week ago
 Total posts:   5635  
 Joined:  Jun 28 2015
United States of America   Maine
Hall of Fame

LARams_1963 wrote:That was a magical game to see in person. Pretty much equal to seeing the Rams win the Super Bowl in person.


Yeah I bet that was a great game to see live.

It was also one of Wade's best games. If you didn't see the game and just looked at the yards and points it might not seem like that. But considering what we know about what Reid & Mahomes can do with that offense, the Rams defense clearly had a big effect on that game. KC had 5 turnovers, the Rams defense scored twice. Donald was playing lights out against a good OL. At the end KC had time to pull it out -- they had 2 drives with under 2 minutes, down by 3. The result was Mahomes going 3-5 with 2 INTs.

And at the same time that was a game where Goff showed he was clutch. Taking back the lead with a TD on a drive that started at the Rams 25 with 2:47 to go. They were down by 4 so a FG would not have tied it. On that drive Goff was 4 out of 5 for 74 yards and a TD.

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21 posts Aug 12 2020